TECHNIQUES

STACK FROM A REFEREE

DOUBLE WRIST CONTROL

THE KNOCK OUT DANGLE

THE REFEREE STACK

THE BEARHUG

THE BANANA SPLIT

THE REFEREE BREAKDOWN

THE CRADLE CARRY

BACKBREAKER WITH ARM

BACKBREAKER

Basically a WWE wrestling move where you drop your opponent over you knee.

THE PILLOW SCARF HOLD (MAKURA-KESA-GATAME)

By making a "pillow" with the upper part of your leg, you ensure that your opponent cannot bridge and twist. You then achieve a "wrap-round" effect by gripping your own upper leg.

THE REVERSE SCARF HOLD (USHIRO-KESA GATAME)

People tend to give up on this hold far too easily. At first it does seem to be weaker than the underneath holds described, but with practice on increasingly stronger partners, it can become very powerful. In this case your right arm encircles your opponent's neck while sitting beside him, while your other arm traps his arm against your chest and arm.

THE BROKEN SCARF HOLD (KUZURE-KESA GATAME)

The word "broken" in the name of this hold does not in any way mean that this hold is weaker than the underneath mentioned hold. It simply means that it is just another form of this family of holds and is slightly different from the "basic" technique. At first beginners will find that this hold is not so easy to maintain against a struggling opponent as the underneath mentioned one, but with practice it can become even stronger. Instead of encircling your opponent's neck with your right arm, you thrust your right arm between your opponent's upper left arm and chest and grips his shoulder. This hand can then act as a "prop" by letting go of the shoulder and placing the palm down on the ground should your opponent suddenly try to bridge and twist to his left.

THE SCARF HOLD (HON-KESA GATAME)

This hold is the most common in use and is usually the first beginners are taught. It is one of the easiest to use following a throwing attack. If you are bigger than your opponent you can afford to use your weight and lie across the chest, but the best method and certainly the one which should be used if you are lighter than your opponent, is the one in which you push your head forward over your opponent's shoulder and down as close to the mat as possible. Your head should be slightly away from your opponent. It is important to sit on the mat alongside your opponent with your legs spread apart to create a good firm hold. You should ensure that your opponent's right arm is trapped by locking his or her forearm with the inside of your left bicep and holding his or her upper right sleeve or arm securely with tour left hand. Your right arm encircles your opponent's neck and your right hand grips his or her upper right collar or shoulder.